Delicious Ginger Tea Recipe

Ever had natural, fresh ginger tea? It’s soothing and refreshing at the same time. Ginger tea has been consumed for centuries, yet it has only recently crossed my radar. I love it!

We’ve been drinking ginger tea because we enjoy the fresh ginger flavour, but it has more than flavour alone.

 

Ginger tea is a lovely, lightly spicy drink for warming up on cold days, and it’s a light, alcohol-free alternative to a nightcap. It soothes upset stomachs and eases indigestion if you over-indulge this holiday season (don’t we all?).

The fresh ginger tea recipe is an excellent drink to keep in your repertoire this winter. Ready to make some?

Alternatively, you can purchase our Fresh Pre Packaged Ginger Tea.

 

Uses for Ginger Tea

Ginger tea is a warming drink for cool weather. It’s a lovely morning or afternoon pick-me-up and a relaxing evening sipper. Try ginger tea if you’re in the mood for a seasonal drink that isn’t heavy like hot chocolate can be!

Ginger tea is a non-alcoholic, non-caffeinated, and virtually calorie-free drink (unless you add a sweetener). So, it’s a great option if you’re cutting back on any of the above.

Ginger tea aids digestion, helps soothe upset stomachs, reduces nausea, and might offer some relief to women with morning sickness. Ginger has been used for centuries to reduce nausea and is the only herb that is almost universally considered safe by conventional standards… ginger ale or ginger sodas usually don’t have enough actual ginger to be effective.

 

How to Make Ginger Tea

I tried several ginger tea methods, and the easiest way is truly the best way. Here’s how to do it:

  1. Thinly slice your fresh ginger. You don’t need to peel it first, but rinse it and scrub off any visible dirt—plan on using about a one-inch piece of ginger per cup of tea.
  2. Combine the ginger with freshwater (use one cup of water per serving).
  3. Bring the mixture to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat as necessary to maintain a gentle simmer.
  4. Simmer for five minutes (or up to 10 minutes if you want extra-strong tea). I usually think it’s spicy enough at five minutes.
  5. Pour the tea through a fine sieve to catch all of the ginger. If desired, serve your tea with a thin round of lemon or orange for some complimentary acidity. You might also appreciate a drizzle of honey or maple syrup, which will temper the fiery ginger flavour.

Read about further benefits of drinking Ginger Tea Here.

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